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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,666 (some duplicates have been removed)
. with professor aaron o'connell also the author of this book "underdogs" the making of the modern marine corps." professor when was the marine corps established? >> 1775 but the birthday is us mess. the record always claims november but that is the date that congress authorized but they never raised the battalion raised then. >> day never were. but the first goes then 28 november but 10 november still celebrated as a birthday. >>host: what was the purpose of the marine corps? >> to be the guard on a ship to protect the officers from the crew it was difficult to salish up they had to have people there so the principal job was to be the ship's guard and served and snipers but it is a very small part of the navy. >> this -- record is complete the service? >> separate inside the navy but they would claim when they served aboard they should follow the rules amadeus served ashore to follow the regulations of the army and in 1832 they are a separate service inside the department of labor. the mission did not change
to afghanistan. as you know we have marines, soldiers, sailors in afghanistan currently, but i'm going to bring you to when i was there during 2010 and 2011 after the president decided to surge the forces. first marine decision, first marine expeditionary force forward entered southwest afghanistan during 2009. we arrived in 2010 so it was a bit more stable. and we went straight to helman and nimruz province. very complex dynamic environment that we were operating in but before i begin it talk to you about the operational picture, i just want to give you a snapshot of afghanistan. when we got there i want to set the frame here so you understand what we're dealing with. afghanistan ranged 180th out of 1 86 on the world bank list of developed countries. 20 percent of the babies won't reach their first year of life. there is a 44 year life span for your average citizen. it has a less than 20 percent literacy rate and girls in afghanistan will marry by the time they are 15 and will likely birth their second child by the time they are 20. so this is the long-term effects of violence and civil w
the overview. >> i talked a little bit about mou's and relationships with the marines. maybe we can talk about how is the national guard and dod resources and capabilities integrated into the command and control at the fire and also the supporting ops centers whether it be the gac or other centers down there. maybe our military personnel can talk about that, or ray. >> it's important to note that we are the supporting effort to cal fire and we get called in when they are basically out of assets. we are working for cal fire, they are the incident commanders, we follow their coordination, typically we're the last ones in and the first ones out. we do have an on-going relationship with cal fire, i'm in contact with cal fire all the time. we have good situational awareness what's going on in the state of california. they normally put us in an alert stat us so we're prepared to respond in an attack mode. i don't often work with chief chaney in southern california, about a month ago we had 9 aircraft at our peak working fires throughout northern california if that answers your question. >> any
, commander steve everett, to his left lieutenant colonel dana, marine corps installation west. thank you. let me go ahead and start off by talking a little bit and just going back over some of the discussions yesterday that i think are going to play into this discussion. we had vice admiral beeman talk a little bit yesterday about capabilities and vice admiral zunkoff talked about partnerships, unity of effort, unity of command. mayor lee talked about dod efforts, expertise, community efforts and as we go into all those discussions today you will see best practices applied during the 10 years from those fires. i have the pleasure of working for administrator fuget in fema headquarters. fema's role is to coordinate response between state and local governments and his focus, his direction to us really comes down it 3 things. he asks us to always plan for the worst case, the maximum of the maximums and it's go to see the department of defense is incorporating this within the catastrophe policy that was spoken about a little earlier. no. 2, he asked us to sppbld and are able to stabilize an in
we served together in the marine corps. i can tell you he's been with fleet week for 3 years now and the one thing about mel, he's got a lot of ideas and he accepts no as an interim answer because a lot of things that he wanted to do to make fleet week better originally the answer from authorities was no. and he made some amazing things happen just through his will. a commander can will things to happen. and i really want to thank you, mel, for that whole peer to peer medical exchange was your idea and it was just a huge hit and i thank you so much for that. he's offered to be the pifrplg hitter for admiral roughhead who was captured back in massachusetts and couldn't make it back out here and with his experience, one thing about melvin speese, he is the premiere taipber in the marine corps. please help me welcome major general melvin speese >> well, of course i am not admiral roughhead, mr. secretary, but i did spend the night at marine's memorial club so i think i'm able to fill in okay. as general my dsz at said, i've had the p opportunity to purpose in fleet week over the
experiences have changed their lives in very profound ways. one example is marine sergeant christian ellis. he suffered a broken back during an ambush in iraq, and in many ways, he felt for a long time maybe his spirit was broken, too. until he converted his story into the most remarkable thing: an opera. pho pho photojournalist gabe ramirez has his story. >> i identified so much with being a combat marine, i didn't think anything outside the world would matter. then people started noticing other talents of mine. i met charlie enberg. he issued a challenge. i want you to create a story that can possibly be turned into a musical. i had this idea of the story being this opera. all actors of this opera come from experiences of my own life. i joined the marine corps because i was one of those young men who didn't have any goals in life, so i thought i would be this kick-ass guy with all these cool machine guns in both hands, and at that time what i perceived to be war is what i took off the movie. that was before i got into the combat zone, but when we got there, that's when everything changed. 20
, the navy, the military in general, the marines, the coast guard, even i saw a couple air force running around here yesterday. the fact that you are here and you are in san francisco and you do this every year, it says a lot. because we lack at -- look at this as a good week. we have a great working relationship and after being there and seeing that it's not a good relationship and people get really, really tense when the guys in green show up, it makes me appreciate what we have all the more. there's one other thing i really appreciate, by the way, and i'll direct this to general speese being the trainer that he is, i got a whole new appreciation for muzzle discipline back there. i appreciate the fact that we drill that into our personnel that don't point anything you don't want to shoot at. because there's one point i was actually in our little van behind a truckload of soldiers and there were a lot of automatic weapons, everybody with fingers on the triggers and muzzles going everywhere and i'm, look, can we just back off a little bit? let's not tailgate quite so much, please. i
is >>> friends and family said good-bye to a san jose marine by officers in california. don knapp is in fremont where the marine's body was laid to rest. >> reporter: ann, it's just a terribly tragic situation. here we have a young man from fremont volunteers for the marines becomes a marine goes to afghanistan. and then comes home safely. he celebrating with a friend in southern california, has a run- in with cops, and now he's dead. so the family is very concerned about this. they would like to have some kind of answers to their questions. they are now demanding an investigation by the united states marine corps. they said that they have contacted washington, d.c. but it's never clear that that sort of thing is going to help. at this point, we have a very grief-stricken family looking for answers. the 22-year-old marine was killed by palm springs police in the early-morning hours of saturday, november 10. corp allen def lena was stationed at camp pendleton in southern california after returning from afghanistan. his family says he was planning to go to college. >> my son was a great kid well
of getting married. a brand new sculpture to icon.ng marine corps we will have that for you and a in a report coming up. cloudy and smiled at the front, but a strong cold in cooler air and rain. the forecast is moments >> continuing now with overdue honor is very marine corps i and the world war i caribbean conflict. and 8-foot statue is now corps museum in va..gle, richard reeve was there for the ceremony. ♪ >> it's an honor to be here for the dedication. >> this will no ordinary sculptured the vacation. a marina'sefinitely marina. eight-foot statue. he was a combat marine. the most decorated marine in history. >> i was 19 years old at the time. he was a private during the war when he saw the colonel up close. >> on the side of the road one he just said, "we've got boys."w, >> would be awarded five navy crosses. you captured the in thisr of a man culture? photographs,ty of perhaps the best way is to the man who served with him. >> i would have taken the oral history. this sculptor, an ex-marine, had stories like this one. he commanded in the bloodiest battles in world war ii and korea. che
for joining us, admiral. (applause). from secretaries and generals to marin county search and rescue over there to nert members, it's a great mix of people and i think that integration is crucial because when we're preparing before during and after a disaster response, everyone in this room has a role to play in one way or another. and it's a great mix. and having been a former fire fighter this topic is important to me. when you think about one point, 1 million fire fighters around the country, they take 2 million calls a year or more to help people in times of need. 63,000 wild fires get beyond their initial attack capability every year, burning over 6.7 million acres. there are over 95 percent effective, they do a great job, but every so often you get that season or that issue that is going to escape or go beyond their ability to stop it right away and right now currently the u.s. forest service that helps provide a lot of air resources and seasonal fire fighters is at the point at the end of that season where every pay period they have to justify keeping those air aviation contract
association in conjunction with commander, u.s. navy third athlete, gerald beman and the united states marine corps major general spie s. the association is comprised of 12 board of directors, all of whom are volunteers. the chairman, major general michael myatt. united states marine corps retired. jod jodie breakenridge, retired. senator finestein and george schulz. the san francisco fleet week board of directors are planning fleet week year round and many city and counties are beginning their own programs to do what san francisco has done with their unprecedented efforts toward humanitarian assistance and training. today we have a world-class lineup for the entire bay area. we have a spectacular venue at the marina green showcasing the marina green. the physical symbol of commitment of federal, state and local agencies to the emergency preparedness of the bay area in a time of crisis. in that wasn't enough, after the parade of ships this morning, the navy's premiere flight demonstration, the blue angels will perform their most daring maneuvering over, under and around the golden gate bridge
good-bye to a san jose marine. he was killed not in the line of duty but by police officers. >> reporter: the 22-year-old marine was killed by police in the early morning hours of saturday november 10th. corporal alan devillena was planning on going to college. >> my son was a great kid. well loved. had charisma. his uppers in the marines. they just love him. everybody. he's worked different platoons and the battalion. >> reporter: police say devillena and a fellow marine were confronted by officers. police say they had talked with marines about public box case. they say the marine attempted to drive off. the car struck the other officer before crashing. both officers fired their guns, killing devillena. >> they didn't have to use deadly force. this wasn't a situation to where it had to come to a wrongful death. >> reporter: there's no evidence that the driver shot at the officers -- >> the actual chain of events happy led up to the officer using their weapons is under investigation. >> reporter: devillena says his son answered the call to serve his country. >> a young man w
that our troops and sailors and marines and soldiers would see if they departed for the pacific theater in world war ii and korea and vietnam, and also the first thing they would see upon returning back to the bay area. so, between the presidio and the head lands, we now have wonderful park lands that have been converted. we call it converting from post to park. repurposing those lands from national defense to environmental defense. and i believe it is probably the most accessful base conversion in the united states. if you haven't been to the presidio, i think you should try and make that. if you're from out of town, it's a spectacular transition there. so, these golden gate national parks that i happen to be the superintendent of has now become after 40 years the second most visited national park in our country. we get 14 million people a year that come to our parks. it has spectacular coastline, includes muir wood, alcatraz, we get to tell the stories, stories about essentially what you and your predecessors did this this area. our headquarters, fort mason, was the fisherman's wharf
to because there's no way he'll ever make it in the marines. [laughter] so quickly realized and i guess that's what they're supposed to do. quickly i realized i set myself. so back to my classroom on the milledge. this overt and i came back here for those who don't know me, i'll take a challenge for easily and i don't take no for easy. if you're one of my commanders, you know that for a fact. went back to my room and started thinking about what the recruiter had done. i was a bartender. i came back to them, left my room. did you know what, if you pack your stuff up right now, i'll send papers and expecting him to say if we can't do today can we'll do it tomorrow. he said okay, let's go. so i didn't tell my father. winnetka massena papers, came back. the only thing in my way now as my father's signature. so we're sitting at the dinner -- actually in the kitchen table may deadlocks and indigos would it be done now? as a dad, i want to go to the marine corps. he said you're going to play football yesterday. i said i'm ready to go. he said if you thought about this? i said yeah, the hour drive u
simply -- [airplane noise] we are at an airport. this is the first marine emergency response facility on the west coast. more simply, we can call it the first fireboat house at an airport. it is a core value for the airport team that we have worked together to provide an exceptional airport, that we are innovating, and that we work in partnership. this is a partnership between the fire department and the airport. great project work by airport staff and the division of design and construction, who designed this building. the engineering staff support to the work. the architectural team and the design and construction staff -- i would like to recognize all the staff involved in the successful project. [applause] completed on budget, and one month ahead of schedule. we have an outstanding fire department staff at the airport. i believe we have one of the most recognized fire department staffs of any major airport in the u.s. the airport is committed to making sure staff has the latest and greatest technology and equipment to support their operation. the team is led by deputy chief mike m
of 1992, i was commanding the first marine division and we had been to the gulf war and we had a lot of parades and we were feeling pretty good about things and on 30 april, 1992, the results of the rodney king trial were announced. two days later, we found the first marine division deployed to compton and watts and one of the most horrific sights i'd ever seen. it was the largest riot in u.s. history. 3,000 people were injured, 60 people were killed, and we actually ended up at one point in time having to use live ammunition. but once we did, the bloods and the krips and the gangs there realized we were serious. the reason we got involved is because they learned none of the police departments within los angeles could talk to each other on their communications gear. they had a different piece of equipment in the los angeles county sheriff's department than the police department or the compton police or the watts police or whoever. we ended up, we were providing radios so they could talk to each other. and i said that that should never happen again. we should have interoperata
and gentlemen, you will witness sailors and marines on the decks of their ship in their uniforms. this is manning the rails and one of the oldest traditions from hundreds of years ago. today members are stationed along the rail to honor ceremonies. the most common is visiting a port not recently visitd and home, departing for or returning from a visit. this started in 1908 when the great white fleet visited this city. in 1981, dyane finestein started fleet week. it remains a grand celebration with the parade of ships. today, san francisco fleet week serves as a mechanism for urban preparedness and partnerships with local and state agencies. this provides the united states military to showcase it's abilities in manages disaster response. more importantly, allows local and state and national first responders to plan, discuss their strategies. whether disaster strikes, we will be ready. first in line for your 2012, san francisco parade of ships in san francisco fire boat phoenix. the phoenix went into service in 1954 with two steam power boats. the public encourages san francisco to
the phone they are talking to the commander, whether it's navy or marine corps. we discuss our local letters of agreement, what they can and cannot do, how we stay within the box of dsca and ir and what the culmination is with a fire drop where we're dropping watter. we conduct aircrew briefings simply because cal fire recognizes that you great folks have a primary mission, that's defense of the nation and we respect that and we understand this is an ancillary job and there is a high revel of rotation of people coming back from afghanistan or iraq, whatever the case may be, but we also reach out to squadron level training. it really comes down to meeting with your cooperating agencies and training together on a frequent basis and having good and open dialogue. >> as i look back at that map here, knowing we were heading into that time of year where we're going to hit significant fire weather and knowing northern california as we are now but eventually southern california, one of the most effective ways to stop the fires from growing is that initial attack, which means we need to be a
it is heading towards the marin coast and we will keep an eye on it and the focus will be the rushing river and for now let's to go to mark, i think this is the first time we have worked together, how are things at the san rafael bridge. >> yes, it is an honor. we have had a few light showers. >> reporter: a little bit of a breeze nothing too major, but you can see we have trees but a wind advisory we have been talking about we are talking about winds starting to pick up in the next few hours. just a few light showers out there as i have mentioned, nothing too extreme, cars are moving towards the toll plaza but the key concern later on today, over the next couple of hours winds are increasing up to 20 to 30 miles per hour. and these bridges, the dumbarton, the bay bridge and the richmond san rafael that will be a concern because the southerly winds will be hitting that side of your car and all of a sudden you will get a stronger gust and that will be our concern. so any time it rains, that will be a double concern over the next few hours. tara moriarty is watching the roadways and has an up
'd likegóñ?ñ to talk just a little bit about. i am a marine corps veterans, who joined in the state oftyñ?ñ? indiana and i have 15 years with the city. i guess i should ask a question. can you work full time for the city and seven on the commission too? i don't want to tie up your time. >> chair kim: my understanding is that you can, but we can certainly ask our city attorney, mr. givner. thesiñ?ñ? question being, can you work full time for the city and county and still serve on the veterans affairslzñ?ñ? commission. i believe the answer is;m t yes, but if we can confirm that. >> cityyñ?ñ? attorney: yes. >> we'll go forward then. i would like to serve on the commission becausex[ñ?ñ?ñ the issue of not having joined the marine corps in san francisco, the years that you serve on active duty cannot be credited towards your retirement. well, my issue with1]iÑtñ thatckñ?ñ? is that when i served on active duty, i served right along with san francisco marines and we had the same duties responsibilities. and this was the
on a twenty-four month pilot basis to the 76 marin headlands bus route, and rename the existing line the 76x marin headlands express and providing an update on other transit effectiveness project plans. mr. chairman, before we move on, would you like to take up the motorcycle parking issue? >> oh, yes. sorry. we received a note here after the item on the motorcycle i think it was -- was it 10.7? >> 10.2b. >> that mr. yee misspoke. there are four spaces. actually turns out there are seven spaces for motorcycles. on the basis of that, would members like to reconsider their vote or what is the pleasure of the board? [speaker not understood]. >> no, not for me. >> director, you made the motion on this because of the public hearing. >> yes, i think the public hearing, the fact the work was going on to change the unused driveways so it could use curb space. i appreciate the member of the public coming forward and calling this to our attention, but i feel like the process has gone through correctly. >> seeing no one wants to revisit the vote or anything, that will stand. >> thank you, mr. chairman.
that was the command of control exercise. we had the marine corps, the navy, and the national guard all working with our department of public works figuring out how would they work together. we didn't give them a lot of coaching, we just kind of put them in a tent and said here is your scenario, here's some problems, and we wanted them to work it out and they did. so it was a very successful year. that's what we did as far as the field exercises. next year i don't know what's next, we're going to explore the lessons learned from this one, we've already learned a bunch, they're going to talk about this shortly then learn what are the next scenarios we can challenge people with. it probably won't be the same ones. we are building the institutional relationships and getting beyond the scenario. it's not just about the heavy equipment operators, it's about city of san francisco staff and departments understanding how the military works and giving the military a chance to work with the civilian authority in a non-crisis environment so that when they have to do it anywhere in the world, they've go
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,666 (some duplicates have been removed)